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Mile High Locavorist

An interview-driven podcast connecting you with the people and energy of Denver's local food movement. Hear from pioneering chefs, restaurateurs, farmers, gardeners as well as non-profit, government and business leaders, all working to build the Mile High City’s local food ecosystem. Mile High Locavorist champions everything produced and processed in the Denver region from fruits and vegetables to meat and dairy, as well beer, wine and spirits, baked goods and other products with an emphasis on organic and sustainable.
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Now displaying: August, 2016
Aug 25, 2016

It’s August in the Mile-High City which means we’re in the middle of the harvest season in the Denver region. I’m pleased to welcome back Chef Elizabeth Buckingham of Moveable Feast Colorado to the second in a series of three episodes designed to help us get the most of the locally-grown fruit and vegetables we’ll see in the early, mid and late-harvest seasons in the Denver region.

Check out the first episode in the series on early-season produce, some of which we are still seeing (leafy greens, herbs): Episode 22: Make the Most of Early Season Produce.

In the mid-season, we’re seeing:

  • The Holy Trinity: Tomatoes, peppers and summer squash
  • Colorado’s best fruit: Melons from the Arkansas River Valley and peaches from the Palisade region
  • Sweetcorn from the Olathe region

Chef Elizabeth is going to talk us through:

  • What we’re going to see in the mid-season
  • What to look for when we buy
  • How to best store it before we’re ready to use it
  • How to prepare it

Chef Elizabeth Buckingham is a Colorado native; she earned a Grande Diplôme from Le Cordon Bleu Paris. A spontaneous scuba diving trip to the Bahamas following her culinary school graduation led to a passion for the ocean and the next eight years of her career, first cooking aboard dive boats and later progressing to head chef aboard private yachts worldwide. In 2009, Elizabeth returned to Colorado and started her own private chef venture, Moveable Feast Colorado, through which she offers all kinds of fun and useful services from in-home classes to edible garden setups. Elizabeth is also a certified Master Gardener and runs a tiny urban homestead complete with chickens and a large vegetable garden. She is an avid home canner and preserver, a passionate advocate of local food and thinks everyone should know how to cook at least a little bit.

– IN THIS EPISODE, YOU’LL LEARN –
  • Why you need to give ugly tomatoes a chance, and quickly, but skip the cooking
  • Why you should consider eating zucchini raw, too
  • How the size of a pepper tells you how spicy it is (generally, at least)
  • Why plastic and the fridge don’t always extend the life of your produce
  • How summer squash plants can make even a novice gardner feel like a pro
  • Why with almost any veggie, a break in the skin signals a quick trip to the kitchen
  • Why, surprisingly, September is our peak harvest month
 – LINKS & RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE –
 – THANKS FOR LISTENING –
Aug 12, 2016

“We’re a health equity organization before we’re a food security organization so we’re not going to deliver someone a totally unhealthy meal just for the sake of filling their stomach.” – Turner Wyatt

Increasing healthful food access is an effort that has grown in prominence over the last few years. It’s a complicated issue. So many factors influence healthful food access – the built environment, food costs, shelf-life, government regulation, nutrition, even social norms and stigmas.

Denver Food Rescue is a young organization meeting the challenge of expanding healthful food access with a unique operating model featuring bicycles, fresh local produce and a “no-cost grocery” concept. In 2015, they delivered enough food for 175,000 healthy meals with a focus on health, not just calories. “Denver Food Rescue is a health equity nonprofit that uses an innovative bicycle-based delivery system to increase the nutritional value in the emergency food assistance system.” And while reducing food waste is not their primary goal, Denver Food Rescue makes a big difference on that front, as well, rescuing 210,000 pounds of food last year. Plus they’re making big strides by employing technology to expand their reach and getting the attention of some big-time donors.
 
*Correction: In my introduction, I incorrectly stated that Denver Food Rescue rescued 175 meals last year, not 175,000. Apologies!
 
– IN THIS EPISODE, YOU’LL LEARN –
  • Why their original operating model from Boulder had to adjust to Denver
  • How low-middle income people fall into a healthful food access gap
  • Why being resident-led in their neighborhoods sets them apart
  • Why linking food waste reduction with hunger relief can be problematic for low-income communities
  • How this model, by its very nature (i.e. bicycles), encourages food localization
  • Why they see themselves as a “health equity” organization over a “food security” organization
  • How you can “Plant An Extra Row” to help those in need to access fresh, local food
– LINKS & RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE –
 – THANKS FOR LISTENING –

This episode (#24) comes from Mile High Locavorist.

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